It's getting warm

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Re: It's getting warm

Postby ukcanuck » Sat May 12, 2012 11:39 am

Per wrote:You know in most ways, a warmer climate is not all that bad for Sweden, but one drawback of the milder winters we've had the last twenty years or so, is an increase in the number of ticks, but also the invasion of the Spanish slug, or "killer slugs" as we call them.

They're not killers as in killer bees, the name comes from them being cannibalistic, so you can often see one of them eating a weaker compadre... Anyway, they're bigger, uglier and more repulsive looking than traditional Swedish slugs, they multiply like crazy (being adapted to the Iberic peninsula and its dry climate they lay hundreds of eggs in the hope that at least some may actually hatch, but in the moister Northern Europe - they all do. :shock: ) and completely devestate gardens. They have no natural enemies here. Apparently the musk duck eats them, but that's about it.

Now that it's spring and I ride my bike to work there are scores of them crawling all over the bike lanes.
Some squashed, others not, but all of them equally disgusting. :evil:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_slug

Still haven't seen any in our garden. Maybe the hedgehogs take care of them? We have two of them living there, a male living under a dutchman's pipe in front of the house and a female living under the playhouse in the backyard. Now during spring the two of them socialise quite a bit in the evenings, some summers we have "hoglets", but the rest of the year they tend to each stay in their designated half of the garden... Anyway, hedgehogs eat slugs, but I've often heard people say that they don't like the Spanish ones. Maybe ours do? :look:



Hey Per here in the UK gardeners use beer as bait in slug traps, it seems they love the taste and an inch of the stuff in a shallow pan or container works great as a death trap for them to drown in... as traps go it seems like a helluva way to die
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Re: It's getting warm

Postby Arachnid » Sat May 12, 2012 3:54 pm

ukcanuck wrote:
Per wrote:You know in most ways, a warmer climate is not all that bad for Sweden, but one drawback of the milder winters we've had the last twenty years or so, is an increase in the number of ticks, but also the invasion of the Spanish slug, or "killer slugs" as we call them.

They're not killers as in killer bees, the name comes from them being cannibalistic, so you can often see one of them eating a weaker compadre... Anyway, they're bigger, uglier and more repulsive looking than traditional Swedish slugs, they multiply like crazy (being adapted to the Iberic peninsula and its dry climate they lay hundreds of eggs in the hope that at least some may actually hatch, but in the moister Northern Europe - they all do. :shock: ) and completely devestate gardens. They have no natural enemies here. Apparently the musk duck eats them, but that's about it.

Now that it's spring and I ride my bike to work there are scores of them crawling all over the bike lanes.
Some squashed, others not, but all of them equally disgusting. :evil:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_slug

Still haven't seen any in our garden. Maybe the hedgehogs take care of them? We have two of them living there, a male living under a dutchman's pipe in front of the house and a female living under the playhouse in the backyard. Now during spring the two of them socialise quite a bit in the evenings, some summers we have "hoglets", but the rest of the year they tend to each stay in their designated half of the garden... Anyway, hedgehogs eat slugs, but I've often heard people say that they don't like the Spanish ones. Maybe ours do? :look:



Hey Per here in the UK gardeners use beer as bait in slug traps, it seems they love the taste and an inch of the stuff in a shallow pan or container works great as a death trap for them to drown in... as traps go it seems like a helluva way to die


It's not the beer...it's the brewers yeast...attracts them then kills them with toxicity...Pair can't use beer in Blue und Yellowland...to expensive to waste on a slug 8-)
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Re: It's getting warm

Postby Topper » Tue Dec 30, 2014 5:40 pm

Per wrote:
Knucklehead wrote:Not to derail this heartwarming thread on global warming but a greater and more immediate threat to mankind is the spent fuel pool #4 at Fukushima.

If that baby gets out of control it could be the end of the world as we know it and I won't feel fine.
http://akiomatsumura.com/2012/04/682.html

Before the Committee, Ambassador Murata strongly stated that if the crippled building of reactor unit 4—with 1,535 fuel rods in the spent fuel pool 100 feet (30 meters) above the ground—collapses, not only will it cause a shutdown of all six reactors but will also affect the common spent fuel pool containing 6,375 fuel rods, located some 50 meters from reactor 4. In both cases the radioactive rods are not protected by a containment vessel; dangerously, they are open to the air. This would certainly cause a global catastrophe like we have never before experienced.


I'm not to worried for myself, I'm 56 this year and have had a good life, Hell I've even been dead once 4 yrs ago, but I feel for all the young people that will have to deal with the horrific afereffects if this shit came down.

More hysteria. Certainly not the end of the world, but perhaps the end of people living in a huge chunk of Japan.

If you read it more carefully they compare it to 85xChernobyl, or half of the total radiation released by all atmospheric nuclear testing. I have a hard time knowing what to do of 85xChernobyl, but let's look at half the total radiation released by all atmospheric nuclear testing. There's been a study published in American Scientist that tries to estimate the health effects atmospheric nuclear testing has had on the American population. Their conclusion is that it has caused an estimated total of 54,000 additional cases of thyroid cancer, some 1,800 deaths in leukemia and some 22,000 cases of other cancers, half of them fatal. You may compare this to the roughly 60,000,000 incidents of cancer expected in the same population by other causes, ie the increase in cancer caused by the fallout was just over 0.1%. That being said, some 40,000 people had their life cut short by these tests, and the increase in thyroid cancer, the one most clearly linked to radioactive fallout, is as high as 10% above the "normal" expected rate.
http://www.americanscientist.org/issues ... er-risks/7

So, what can we conclude from this? If the fallout from all atmospheric testing caused an additional 40,000 cancer deaths in the USA, and an overall increase in cancer rates of roughly 0.1%, isn't this roughly the magnitude we should expect from the Japanese situation, if they compare it to half the radiation released by all nuclear testing? Granted, this is a bit more concentrated, so maybe we should compare it to the effects on the 14,000 people on the Marshall Islands, where cancer rates have jumped a whooping 3% due to nuclear testing.

Let's try some middle ground. Let's assume that cancer rates in Japan increase by 1%. Incidently, Japan today has roughly the same population size the USA had in the 1950's. Assuming that cancer rates are roughly the same (probably not, the Japanese have a healthier life style), we should have the same estimated 60,000,000 life time cancers. The expected effect should then be an additional 600,000 cancer cases, half of which are fatal. Let's say that the global effects, where of course the concentration has been diluted, adds the same number of cancers in the outside world. We then look at a total of some 600,000 people dying as a result of this incident over the next 50-70 years. We're talking about perhaps 10,000 people per year. Then compare this to the current global death rate, with more than 150,000 people dying every day, or 56,000,000 per year.

As catastrophic as this scenario is, and especially locally in Japan... Seriously, I think we've seen worse. :?

Yes, a lot of people may die. Yes, a large chunk of Japan may be unfit for human habitation for decades, but no, it's not the end of the world, or even of civilisation as we know it.

As a comparisson, a survey published in the Lancet suggested that the American war on Iraq had caused 654,965 excess deaths in the Iraqi population between March 2003 and June 2006. This figure is much higher than the official body counts, but that is because they compare the total number of deaths in this time to the total number of deaths in a similar time frame before the invasion. Thus they do not just include people who die from fighting, but also people who die due to deteriorating infrastructures leading to lack of healthcare, safe drinking water, etc and an increase in lawlessness.
http://brusselstribunal.org/pdf/lancet111006.pdf

Fallout is reaching BC waters and expected to peak in the next couple of years.

Somewhere around peak levels in the 70's and 80's from nuclear bomb testing.

http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Fall ... story.html

The scientists predict the Fukushima radioactivity off North America will continue to increase before peaking in 2015-16 at levels comparable to those seen in the 1980s as a result of nuclear testing. Then levels are expected to decline and, by 2021, should return to levels seen before that Fukushima accident — considered one of the most serious nuclear reactor accidents.


The background level for Cesium-137 in the Pacific Ocean is about one becquerel (Bq) — the decay of one Cesium-137 nucleus per second — per cubic metre of seawater. Fukushima has increased the radiation level off the B.C. coast to about 2 Bq and the level is expected to peak about 3 to 5 Bq per cubic metre of water by 2015-16. Canada’s drinking-water standard for Cesium-137 is 10,000 becquerels (10 kBq) per cubic metre.
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